Departments

Student looking through microscope in Biology.

Computer Science

The computer science program is designed to provide students with the necessary skills to effectively use a variety of technology applications in academic and work-related settings. An introduction to computer usage policies and procedures is part of the Dynamics of Effective Study course required for eighth grade students. Internet safety is an essential part of the course.

COURSES

3D Computer Animation
Introduction to Coding
Multimedia I
Multimedia II


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Introduction to Coding using Ruby (Elective)
This course is a one semester elective course that focuses on computer programming, or coding, using the Ruby Programming Language. Ruby is an easy-to-learn, yet powerful object-oriented programming language with a wide variety of applications. It is the basis of Ruby on Rails, which is used to build popular websites such as Twitter, Soundcloud, Kickstarter, Groupon and Jango. Objectives for this course will be for students to learn a brief history of computer programming, discuss the contributions of women in the computer science field and understand the processes for planning and building simple computer applications using Ruby. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to design, test and implement their own applications.

3D Computer Animation (Elective)
3D printing is quickly becoming a new outlet to transform ideas into objects. In this course, students will learn skills necessary to become a 3D printer and to bring your ideas to life! This course will uncover the core processes behind 3D printing and reveal that it's open and accessible to anyone. Students will use high tech software to build and create their designs into objects with the 3D Printer. The second half of the class students will use a professional 3D software program, After Effects, to create 3D text, video and animation. Learning After Effects gives students a chance to learn how to use motion-graphics professionals, website designers and visual effect artists use for post-production on digital films, DVDs, video and the web.

Multimedia I (Elective)
Images are a part of every facet of life. Students come out of this class with a variety of digital design skills and digital image-making skills that will help them express themselves digitally. Students learn about many resources available in Adobe Creative Cloud and work in Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign and more. You will complete projects that will get you comfortable with illustrating, designing, retouching, creating visual effects. Students will obtain knowledge and skills about career possibilities in technology and graphic design.

Multimedia II (Elective)
This student-centered course is designed to reach the process of planning, instructional design, development and publishing of digital media for interactive media projects. This course will teach you how to develop and apply programming skills to creative work. This is an important 21st century skill to use images, audio, video and graphics. This course will develop technical computer skills and the development of creative work that applies to these skills.

English

The mission of the English department is to enable students to comprehend, interpret, and analyze various literary genres and to communicate effectively through both verbal and written means, using proper grammatical and mechanical conventions.

The mission of the English department is to enable students to comprehend, interpret, and analyze various literary genres and to communicate effectively through both verbal and written means, using proper grammatical and mechanical conventions.

Courses

English I           
English II
English III
English IV
English V
African American Literature
Creative Writing
Journalism

Honors
English I H           
English II H
English III H
English IV H
English V H

Advanced Placement
English IV AP (Literature & Composition)
English V AP (Language & Composition)

 


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

English I
This course is an introduction to basic high school English skills. The course encompasses the development of basic composition skills, the use of expanded vocabulary, and the exposure to various literary genres. The students will be expected to write narrative and expository essays and will be required to complete a researched essay.

English I Honors
This honors course is an in-depth study of basic composition skills with emphasis on paragraph development and use of an expanded vocabulary. The student is introduced to various writing techniques, including but not limited to descriptive, persuasive, and comparison/contrast. The student is also exposed to various literary genres. Each student will be required to complete a researched essay.

English II
This course builds on and refines the basic skills taught in English I. Students explore and analyze various literary genres. Students are introduced to the concepts of unity, coherence, and concision in their written work and are introduced to the multi-paragraph essay. Vocabulary enrichment and an emphasis on grammar skills are encouraged. Each student is required to complete a researched essay.

English II Honors
English II Honors is a continuation of English I Honors, emphasizing paragraph development and the multi-paragraph essay and its construction. In writing, unity and coherence are strongly emphasized, as well as an expanded vocabulary and correct grammar. Students explore various literary genres in great depth and write analytical essays on a range of topics related to each genre. In addition, each student is required to complete a researched essay.

English III
This course is a historical survey of American literature. Students study techniques of expository writing and writing about literature. Vocabulary enrichment and an emphasis on grammar skills are enhanced. Each student is required to write a researched essay on a literary piece.

English III Honors
This honors course is a historical survey of American literature in which students read, discuss, analyze, and interpret the works of different literary periods. Each student’s style and writing voice are stressed within several critical essays. Both vocabulary enrichment and grammar skills are emphasized; students are expected to integrate these skills into their writings. A researched literary analysis is mandatory for all students.

English IV
This course is a thematic survey of British literature. The revising and editing process is stressed in writing, along with concentration on word choice and sentence construction. Vocabulary enrichment and grammar skills are emphasized, and every student is required to write a researched literary analysis.

English IV Honors
This honors course is a thematic survey of British literature emphasizing the interpretation and analysis of various works of each time period. Diction and syntax are emphasized in writing, as well as the further development of each student’s style and writing voice. Vocabulary enrichment and grammar skills are emphasized. Every student is also required to write a researched literary analysis.

English IV Advanced Placement Program 
Literature & Composition (Honors)
The Advanced Placement Program of Literature and Composition includes the equivalent of a full year college course and prepares the student for the Advanced Placement Examination given in May. Representative works from various genres and periods from both the English and American traditions and from various periods beginning with the sixteenth century are studied in depth. Every student will write a researched literary analysis.

English V
This course involves the study of World Literature and American Contemporary Literature. Grammar skills and vocabulary enrichment are emphasized. Writing in a variety of genres allows students to develop their own unique writing styles and voices. In addition, students are required to write an analytical researched essay.

English V Honors
This course involves the analysis and interpretation of a variety of works from World Literature and American Contemporary Literature. Grammar skills and vocabulary enrichment are emphasized. Writing in a variety of genres allows students to develop their own writing styles and voices. In addition, students are required to write an analytical researched essay.

English V Advanced Placement Program
Language and Composition (Honors)
The Advanced Placement Program of Language and Composition includes the equivalent of a full term college course and prepares the student for the Advanced Placement Examination given in May. This course focuses on the mastery of advanced writing skills, including the mechanics of language usage in the development of polished essays. Selections from a variety of authors are used as models to reflect the professional structure and usage of language. In addition, students are required to write a researched persuasive essay.

African American Literature (Elective)
This course is a survey of prominent African American writers and texts ranging from the pre-Civil War era to contemporary times. Class reading focuses primarily on prose fictions, but will also include poetry and non-fiction works such as essays, letters, and speeches.

Creative Writing (Elective)
This course provides students an opportunity to study artistic qualities of literature to create their own works of short fiction, poetry, and creative non-fiction. The course fosters an appreciation of literary art as well as an understanding of the ways in which such art is made. Students learn how to create, revise, and discuss their own writing. Students should have prior exposure to a variety of literature as well as a firm understanding of key grammatical and literary concepts and terms.

Family and Consumer Sciences

The mission of the Mount Carmel Academy Family and Consumer Sciences Department is to educate our students in life skills so that they will be able to function and prosper socially, economically, physically and mentally in their daily lives.

COURSES

Interior Design
Food and Nutrition
Child Development


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Interior Design (Elective)
Students will explore the design basics of space planning, furniture arrangement, color selection and material selections. This course will cover basic drafting such as floor plans, elevations and perspective drawing. Students will demonstrate their design skills with an interior design computer program. Students are required to pay a lab fee which covers supplies.

Food and Nutrition (Elective)
The students will study nutrition basics and are encouraged to be knowledgeable about new research in the field of nutrition and its relevance to the consumer. The students participate in special preparation skills and techniques as well as studies in food science. Studies in the areas of food safety, food additives, labeling, and supermarket strategies help the student to become a more astute consumer. Lab fee required.

Child Development (Elective)
This course will provide students with an understanding of the aspects of human growth and development of young children. Parenting skills will be developed as positive guidance techniques and child-related issues are studied. Learning activities, observation techniques, and lab experiences in working with young children will be included. Students will also be introduced to various careers related to the Child Development field.

Fine Arts

The mission of the Mount Carmel Academy Fine Arts Department is to foster creative expression and an appreciation of God-given gifts through the performing and visual arts.

COURSES

Acting I
Acting II
Art I
Art II
Art III
Art IV
Beginning Choir
Chorale
Careers and Colleges
Dynamics of Effective Study
Fine Arts Survey
Photography
Speech
Television Production I
Television Production II

Comptuer Science/Fine Arts Courses*
3D Computer Animation
Multimedia I
Multimedia II
*See Computer Science Deptartment for course descriptions


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
 

FINE ARTS SURVEY

Fine Arts Survey 
Fine Arts Survey is an overview of the arts that includes visual art, music, theater and dance from the prehistoric period until
the present. The object of the Fine Arts Survey course is to give students an introduction to understanding the four arts, how they are related, and how they each touch our lives. Some hands-on lab work and out-of-class work are expected. Final examination will be a project. Students are required to attend and/or participate in all Mount Carmel Academy Fine Arts Events.

Fine Arts Survey–Music Focus 
Fine Arts Survey–Music Focus is an overview of all the arts, with an in-depth focus on music. Students explore topics such as the philosophy and history of music, music theory, and vocal technique. Over the course of the semester students will learn three choral pieces and perform them together at the choir concert as their final exam.

ART

Art I–Painting and Drawing I (Elective)
Art I is designed to teach students the basic application of the elements of art and the principles of design. Students will develop skills in producing visual art in a variety of media and techniques as well as develop creative problem solving skills. Students will learn how to evaluate their own art, as well as art made by other students and artwork from different cultures and historical periods. Students will draw from direct observation, maintain a sketchbook, and develop a portfolio during the semester. Art I students participate in an art exhibit at the end of the course. 

Art II–Painting and Drawing (Elective)
Students will apply their knowledge of the elements of art and principles of design and continue to explore a variety of media and techniques. Students will continue to develop creative problem solving skills and engage in forms of higher level thinking that foster creative risk taking. Students will draw from direct observation, maintain a sketchbook, develop a portfolio, and participate in class critiques. Art II students participate in an art exhibit at the end of the course. Completion of Art I is a pre-requisite to Art II. 

Art III and Art IV (Elective)
Art III and IV are designed to continue an in-depth study of visual art. Students will apply their knowledge of the elements of art and the principles of design. Students will continue to draw from direct observation, maintain a sketchbook, and develop a portfolio. Students will be expected to be creative risk takers and to engage in forms of higher level thinking in the development of their artwork. Students participate in an art exhibit at the end of the course. Competition of Art II is a pre-requisite to Art III and IV. The teacher’s recommendation and portfolio review are required for entrance to Art III and IV. Fee required.

MUSIC

Beginning Choir
Beginning Chorus is designed to introduce students to beginning-to-intermediate level vocal technique and music theory. Beginning chorus is for students who desire to acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to be placed in Chorale in the future. Students who audition for Chorale but are not yet ready for advanced course work will be placed in Beginning Choir. Students in the Beginning Choir prepare concert music for both Mount Carmel Academy Choir Concerts.

Chorale
Chorale is Mount Carmel Academy’s audition-only competitive treble ensemble. As a class, Chorale is designed to challenge advanced music students with rigorous vocal technique and music theory course work. The Mount Carmel Academy Chorale prepares concert music for numerous events, concerts, and competitions throughout the year, including: community events, the Mount Carmel Academy Christmas Concert, Louisiana All-State Choir, Louisiana Solo & Ensemble Contest, Louisiana Large Ensemble Contest, and the Mount Carmel Academy Spring Concert.

Television Production I (Elective)
Television Production I course will prepare you to learn the fundamentals of television journalism. You will gain practical skills in our state-of-the art digital television studio. You will receive “hands-on” training recording video, editing and utilizing graphics and music to enhance video production. You will also develop interviewing, reporting and writing skills. This course will give you an opportunity to become a global citizen with daily attention on current affairs/news. This class emphasizes the basics of broadcasting but also emphasizes leadership, teamwork, planning and learning about a growing field. Fee required.

Television Production, Part II (Elective)
Students in Television Production II, will be part of the news team that helps create WMCA. The course emphasizes production value. Students will work in groups and individually on news reports. Students will be a part of the studio crew producing WMCA Live! Students will have a chance to learn all roles involved in producing a live weekly show by rotating positions throughout the semester. TV II students will also enter national/local broadcast journalism competitions. This class will prepare students for work in major professional stations. Students will visit a professional television studio and acquire the skills to use advanced television and film editing equipment. Prerequisite: Television Production I. Fee required.


Theatre

Acting I (Elective)
Among the educational goals of Acting, Part 1, are the development of creative abilities in the performing arts; historical and analytical skills for theater history and dramatic literature; communication and organizational abilities through theatrical production; respect for diversity in the collaborative process of making theater; and the ability to enhance the quality of one’s life. Students are required to attend one theatrical production outside of Mount Carmel Academy. Fee required.

Acting II (Elective)
Acting, Part 2, is a continuation of Acting, Part 1 skills and the applications of these skills through theater exercises, physical and vocal warm-ups, characterization studies, and participation in scenes and performances. Theater students will acquire the requisite intellectual background and essential artistic experience to pursue careers or further study. Students are required to attend one theatrical production outside of Mount Carmel Academy.


ADDITIONAL ELECTIVES

Photography (Elective)
This course examines a variety of techniques to improve their photography skills. Students learn how to operate digital SLR cameras, identifying its features and uses in various situations. Fundamental elements of photography, including composition, exposure and depth of field are explored through lab activities and projects. Techniques for framing, , dealing with background and lighting, and composition in portraiture are presented. Image editing and correcting flaws are examined through Photoshop software in the computer lab.

Speech I (Elective)
Speech class is a practium class where the students are taught the basics of communication and public speaking. In addition to studying all aspects of communication, students are required to write and present speeches in front of their audience with a focus on pinpointing their strengths and strengthening any areas in need of improvement to become a well-rounded presenter.

Foreign Language

The mission of the Foreign Language Department is for every student to acquire an understanding of the language she is studying as well as to express herself clearly and effectively in the target language. Our mission is to encourage students to develop a recognition of the universality of human experience and an understanding of the people whose language is studied through insights into their values and behavioral patterns.
 

COURSES

Spanish I
Spanish II
Spanish III
French I
French II
French III

Honors
Latin I H
Latin II H
Latin III H
Latin IV/V H
French I H
French II H
French III H
French IV H
French V H
Spanish I H
Spanish II H
Spanish III H
Spanish IV H

Advanced Placement
Latin IV/V AP
Spanish V AP


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

LATIN

Latin I Honors
Latin I is offered at the honors level only. The objective of this beginner's course is to bring students quickly to the point where they can read continuous Latin prose. Emphasis is placed on the mastery of basic vocabulary and grammar. The textbook readings are based on stories from classical sources which enable the students to discuss Roman mythology, history, and culture. The course includes the study of the influence of Latin on the English language in order to strengthen vocabulary skills in both languages.

Latin II Honors
The objective of Latin II is to expand the students' command of vocabulary and grammar. The nature of the textbook readings ensures that students continue to develop their understanding of the cultural background of the Romans and furthering their mastery of formal grammar, syntax, and style.

Latin III Honors
Latin III is an elective course for students who take Latin I in the ninth grade and Latin II in the tenth grade. For students who take Latin II in ninth grade, Latin III is a required course. Latin III is an honors course. The objective of the course is to complete the students' understanding of grammatical constructions and translate original Latin texts. Students read selections from Cicero, Livy, Pliny and others. Readings allow students to examine what the Romans had to say about themselves, their society, politics, and history.

Latin IV/V Honors
Latin IV/V Honors is an elective course open to students who have completed Latin III. This course focuses on selected Roman authors (per the instructor’s decision). Students will translate and discuss selected works by these authors, with special attention to scansion and poetic devices. Students who take Latin IV/V Honors in the eleventh grade are eligible to take Latin IV/V AP in the twelfth grade, and vice versa. Because students will read different authors each year, students who take Latin IV Honors may take Latin V Honors.

Latin IV/V AP
Latin IV/V AP is an elective course open to students who have completed Latin III. This course focuses on the skills of comprehending, literally translating, contextualizing, and analyzing Latin texts, with a focus on Vergil’s Aeneid and Caesar’s Gallic Wars. All students enrolled in the course are required to take the AP exam in May. Students who take Latin IV/V AP in the eleventh grade may choose to take Latin IV/V Honors in the twelfth grade, and vice versa.

FRENCH

French I
French I introduces students to the four skills of language learning: reading, writing, listening and speaking. Students study basic vocabulary, grammar, functional expressions and culture. Classroom activities focus on vocabulary recognition, comprehension and simple communication in French.

French I Honors
French I Honors is a comprehensive first look at the vocabulary, grammar structures and cultural aspects that encompass the French-speaking world. The student builds on the basics: reading, writing, listening and speaking. The teacher uses the target language to facilitate the class. Students are required to speak in the target language and are expected to participate in every class. In the second semester, students will take the first level of the National French Exam (Le Grand Concours).

French II
This course is offered to students who have had one year of high school French or three or more years of French in elementary school and have passed a placement test for second year French. French II builds on the initial vocabulary and grammar learned in French I adding more advanced grammatical concepts. This course explores the cultural traditions of the Francophone world. Emphasis on reading, writing, speaking and listening at this level encourages students to communicate in French.

French II Honors
This course is offered to students who have had one year of high school French or three or more years of French in elementary school and have passed a placement test for second year French. French II Honors engages students in an accelerated pace of language learning and usage. Students enhance their skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking. The class is primarily taught in the target language and students are required to speak in the target language and to participate in every class. In the second semester, students take the second level of the National French Exam (Le Grand Concours).

French III
French III has as prerequisites successful completion of French I and French II. Eighth graders enrolled in French I are required to take French II and French III. Students who enter in the ninth grade with a credit in French I are required to take French II and French III. The course stresses communication in the target language and explores cultural topics. Emphasis on reading, writing, speaking and listening at this level encourages students to communicate in French.

French III Honors
In addition to the requirements of French III, supplemental reading will include various authentic articles. Idioms and an enriched vocabulary are also explored. The class is primarily taught in the target language and the students are required to speak in the target language and to participate in every class. In the second semester, students will take the third level of the National French Exam (Le Grand Concours).

French IV Honors
This course is offered to students who have successfully completed French III. French IV emphasizes the perfecting of communication in the target language. The course stresses interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational communication through culture and grammar. Students will study complex tenses and sentence structures and will read various excerpts from French literature. Culture will be explored through authentic articles, videos and films. The class is primarily taught in the target language and the students are required to speak in the target language and to participate in every class. In the second semester, students will take the fourth level of the National French Exam (Le Grand Concours).

French V Honors
This course is offered to students who have successfully completed French IV. The course objectives of written, spoken, audio, visual and audio-visual communication are defined by three modes of communication: interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational. The course themes give students the opportunity to integrate language and culture in a variety of contexts: global challenges, science and technology, contemporary life, personal and public identities, families and communities, and beauty and aesthetics. Authentic media and materials will be used. The class is primarily taught in the target language and the students are required to speak in the target language and to participate in every class. In the second semester, students will take the fifth level of the National French Exam (Le Grand Concours).

SPANISH

Spanish I
Spanish I is a comprehensive first look at the introductory vocabulary, foundational grammar structures and cultural aspects that encompass the Spanish-speaking world. Students develop skills in reading, writing, listening and speaking. Students are expected to master basic conversational skills. Much of the class is conducted in Spanish.

Spanish I Honors
Spanish I Honors is a comprehensive first look at the introductory vocabulary, foundational grammar structures and cultural aspects that encompass the Spanish-speaking world. There is a more intensive focus on the basic structures: reading, writing, listening and speaking. The teacher uses the target language to facilitate the class and goes beyond the book to expand on certain areas. Students are required to speak in the target language, and are expected to participate in every class. Students will take the first level National Spanish exam in the second semester.

Spanish II
This course is offered to students who have had one year of high school Spanish or three or more years of Spanish in elementary school and have passed a placement test for second year Spanish. Spanish II builds on the initial vocabulary and grammar learned in Spanish I. At this level, emphasis on reading, writing, speaking and listening at this level encourages students to communicate more in Spanish.

Spanish II Honors
This course is offered to students who have had one year of high school Spanish or three or more years of Spanish in elementary school and have passed a placement test for second year Spanish. Reading, writing and listening skills are further developed in this course. The class is primarily taught in the target language, and the students are required to speak in the target language and to participate in every class. The culture of several Spanish-speaking countries is discussed through film, literature, poetry and realia. Students will take the second level National Spanish exam in the fourth nine weeks.

Spanish III
Spanish III has as prerequisites successful completion of Spanish I and Spanish II. Eighth graders enrolled in Spanish I are required to take Spanish II and Spanish III. Students who enter in the ninth grade with a credit in Spanish I are required to take Spanish II and Spanish III. The course stresses communication in the target language. At this level, emphasis on reading, writing, speaking and listening encourages students to communicate more in Spanish.

Spanish III Honors
In addition to the requirements of Spanish III, the honors course focuses more on listening and speaking. Grammar in this course covers all tenses and the subjunctive mood. Literature, as well as current issues taken from various media, is used to enhance the students’ communication skills. The class is primarily taught in the target language, and the students are required to speak in the target language and to participate in every class. Culture is studied more extensively through art, history, and film. Students will take the level three National Spanish exam in the fourth nine weeks.

Spanish IV Honors
Spanish IV Honors is offered to students who have successfully completed Spanish III. Students will further develop their communication skills (reading, writing, and presentational) as well as enhance their cultural knowledge. The class is primarily taught in the target language, and the students are required to speak in the target language and to participate in every class. The culture of several Spanish-speaking countries as well as the Hispanic presence in the United States is researched in depth through film, literature, newspaper articles and student-created projects and presentations. Students will take the level four National Spanish exam during the spring semester.

Spanish V Advanced Placement
This course is offered to students that have completed four years of high school Spanish. Students will further develop their proficiency in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing. The course emphasizes active communication skills that are useful in themselves and that can be applied to various activities and disciplines. Extensive training in the organization and writing of compositions are an important part of this course. Films, newspapers, and magazines are used to explore different Spanish and Latin cultures and literature. The class is primarily taught in the target language, and the students are required to speak in the target language and to participate in every class. Students are required to take the AP exam at the end of the course. Students must complete Spanish IV honors in order to enroll in this course.

Health and Physical Education

The philosophy of the Health and Physical Education Department is centered on an appreciation of and respect for the human body as created by God. Classes provide an atmosphere focused on enhancing physical, mental, social, and spiritual attributes through meaningful physical activity and teamwork in order to promote life-long movement. It is our hope that students will incorporate health wellness and physical movement/exercise into their daily lives.

Library

The mission of the Mount Carmel Academy Library is to provide a wide range of print and digital resources to support the schools commitment to a quality Catholic education. The library offers a dynamic, technology rich environment to support 21st century learning and ensures that students and staff inquire, think critically, and gain knowledge to thrive in a complex information environment.

Mathematics

The mission of the Mathematics Department is to train students to think and communicate logically, to develop an understanding of the language of mathematics across the curriculum, to develop the ability to analyze and interpret problems and situations, to apply concepts to real life situations and to prepare for a post high school career.

COURSES

Algebra I
Algebra II
Algebra III
Advanced Math—Functions and Statistics
Geometry

Honors
Algebra I H
Algebra II H
Calculus H
Geometry H
Pre-Calculus H

Advanced Placement
Calculus AP

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Algebra I
Algebra I begins with a review of the properties of real numbers needed for solving linear equations. The course introduces relations and functions with a focus on the real-world applications and multiple representations of functions. Algebra I students study linear functions and their applications, including linear inequalities. The second semester of Algebra I begins with an introduction to systems of linear equations with applications. The properties of exponents and polynomials concludes with an introduction to quadratic functions.

Algebra I Honors
Algebra I Honors engages the students with the same topics as Algebra I in greater depth and also includes an introduction to exponential functions.

Geometry
Algebra I or Algebra I Honors is a prerequisite for Geometry. This course begins with the basic vocabulary needed for geometry in two and three dimensions, and a discussion of formal logic and reasoning. Additional topics included are angle pair relationships, perpendicular and parallel lines, congruent triangles, properties of triangles, similarity, right triangles, trigonometric ratios, quadrilaterals, circles, and surface area and volume of solids.

Geometry Honors
Algebra I or Algebra I Honors is a prerequisite for Geometry Honors. This course contains all topics from Geometry, in addition to advanced algebraic applications. Critical thinking with cumulative knowledge is expected. Test-taking methods, formula manipulation, and technical writing are required components of projects and exams.

Algebra II
Geometry or Geometry Honors is a prerequisite for Algebra II. Algebra II continues the work of Algebra I, reviewing relations and functions before extending these to the transformations of functions, inverse functions, composition of functions, and piecewise functions. The course then focuses on applications of linear functions and systems, extends quadratic function concepts, and discusses general polynomial functions. The end of Algebra II branches into exponential and logarithmic functions with a focus on real-world application.

Algebra II Honors
 Algebra I Honors and Geometry Honors are prerequisites for Algebra II Honors. Algebra II Honors contains all of the topics in Algebra II in addition to rational and radical functions, and sequences and series. The course is designed to challenge students to think critically by applying advanced skills with a problem-solving approach.

Algebra III
Algebra II or Algebra II Honors is a prerequisite for Algebra III. Algebra III extends the use of concepts and skills from Algebra II, beginning the first semester with the family of functions, transformations of functions, function applications, and graphical representations of real-world data. The second semester includes rational functions, conic sections, radical functions, and sequences and series.

PreCalculus Honors
Algebra II Honors is a prerequisite for PreCalculus Honors. Pre-Calculus Honors begins with angles on the coordinate plane, degree and radian measures, arc length, area of a sector, and linear and angular speed. In addition, students learn the unit circle, trigonometric functions of any angle, graphing trigonometric functions, and inverse trigonometric functions. In the second semester, students move on to analytic trigonometry, which includes verifying fundamental identities, solving trigonometric equations, and solving oblique triangles using the Laws of Sines and Cosines. Finally, the course concludes with the polar coordinate system. Throughout the year, students will be challenged to think critically, utilize various problem-solving techniques, and advance their algebra skills.

Advanced Math: Functions and Statistics
Algebra III is a prerequisite for Advanced Math. Advanced Math is a senior course that combines concepts and skills from trigonometry, probability, and statistics, in order to prepare students for college-level mathematics courses. The first semester begins with a study of angles on the coordinate plane, the use of degree and radian measures, and the unit circle. Next, students will work to gain a richer understanding of the trigonometric functions, their graphs, and their inverses. Students will learn to verify fundamental trigonometric identities and solve trigonometric equations. The second part of the course will include applications of the principles of probability and probability distributions, data collection techniques, univariate and bivariate statistics, and correlation and regression.

Statistics Honors
PreCalculus Honors is a prerequisite for Statistics Honors. Statistics Honors is a course for seniors who are interested in liberal arts and social science college majors, and challenges students to use both descriptive and inferential statistics with real-world statistical data. The first semester begins with a discussion of the difference between a sample and population, independent and dependent variables, sampling methods, frequency distributions, and measures of central tendency and variation. Next, students will explore normal distributions and standard scores, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. Finally, the course will end with measures of correlation, bivariate and multivariate regression. Throughout the year, students will work to improve their critical thinking, logic, and reasoning skills, as well as strengthen their ability to apply theoretical concepts to the development of practical solutions.

Calculus Honors
PreCalculus Honors is a prerequisite for Calculus Honors. Calculus Honors is a course for seniors who are interested in math- and science-related college majors. This course begins with evaluating limits, numerically, graphically, and analytically, as well as continuity and the limit definition of the derivative. The remaining topics include derivatives, applications of derivatives (such as position, velocity, and acceleration functions), implicit differentiation, related rates, extrema, concavity, and optimization problems. Finally, students will learn integration, including Riemann sums, definite and indefinite integrals, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, and the area between curves. This course is designed to motivate students to apply basic skills with a problem-solving approach, while introducing them to topics typically covered in the first semester of college calculus.

Calculus Advanced Placement
PreCalculus Honors is a prerequisite for Calculus Advanced Placement. Calculus Advanced Placement is a course for seniors who are interested in math- and science-related college majors. This course covers differential and integral calculus as prescribed by the College Board in preparation for the Calculus AB exam, and is modeled upon a typical 5-credit college calculus course. Students study the ideas of functions, graphs, limits, areas and rates of change. This course will help to develop critical thinking skills through exposure to new mathematical concepts, as such skills are useful in many college majors. To be successful in Calculus AP, a good foundation in algebra and trigonometry is needed; these prerequisite skills are briefly reviewed throughout the year as the need arises.

Introduction to Engineering
The course will emphasize engineering design, an introduction to the different disciplines, and the development skills that will aid in introduction college engineering classes. The course will be structured as a project-based learning engineering elective (similar to the January school-wide design cycle activity). The grade for each design cycle activity will be based on: an evaluation of the group dynamic during these projects, an oral presentation, technical writing submission about the project and a physical model of the activity. The end of the semester will be dedicated to a final design project.

Science

The mission of the Science Department of Mount Carmel Academy is to provide all students with an experience of scientific procedures and an understanding of life science, the physical world, and the natural laws controlling them. We further seek to assist students in the development of a scientific attitude characterized by honesty, open-mindedness, suspended judgment, self-criticism and commitment to accuracy.

COURSES

Physical Science
Biology
Chemistry
Physics
Environmental Science
Anatomy and Physiology
Physics II
Introduction to Engineering

Honors
Physical Science H
Biology H
Chemistry H
Physics H
Biology II H
Chemistry II H

Advanced Placement
Biology AP


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Physical Science
This course will build a conceptual and computational foundation in physics and chemistry. Understanding and use of the metric system, significant digits, scientific notation, graphical analysis and problem solving will be emphasized. Students will learn about the laws that govern the physical world and develop an appreciation for the order of the universe.

Physical Science Honors
This in-depth course will build a conceptual and computational foundation in physics and chemistry, with an emphasis on mathematical applications. Understanding and use of the metric system, significant digits, scientific notation, graphical analysis and problem solving, will be emphasized. The honors students are required to analyze data, think analytically and draw conclusions through laboratory exercises. Students will learn about the laws that govern the physical world and develop an appreciation for the order of the universe.

Biology I
This course presents an introduction to major biological topics ranging from molecular foundations to topics dealing with the complexity of the human body. Through reading, written assignments, class discussions, computer-related activities, and laboratory exercises, the student becomes familiar with such concepts as the cell, genetics, evolution, ecology, the plant and animal kingdom, animal development, the anatomy and physiology of the human body, scientific investigations and data analysis..

Biology I Honors
This honors course offers a challenging study of the major biological concepts ranging from molecular foundations to animal and plant physiology, with particular emphasis on the detail of the human body, genetics and advanced laboratory experiments beyond the regular biology curriculum. The honors students are required to analyze data, think analytically and draw conclusions, create formal lab reports, perform computer-related activities, participate in class discussions, complete written assignments, and complete reading assignments. The honors course completes more biology chapters and experiments at an accelerated pace.

Chemistry I
This course is a basic, introductory course with laboratory investigation. Topics covered include matter and energy, measurement and accuracy, gases, quantum theory, the periodic table, chemical bonding, chemical reactions, and calculations.

Chemistry I Honors
This honors course is an introductory chemistry course with laboratory investigation. Topics covered include matter and energy, measurement and accuracy, gas equations, quantum theory, the periodic table, chemical bonding, molecular geometry, chemical reactions, and calculations. The course includes in-depth analysis of chemical concepts, extensive laboratory work, and an emphasis on chemical computations.

Physics I
This course offers the student a basic laboratory experience of physical science. Topics covered include measurement, graphing, interpretation of experimental data, motion on earth and in the heavens, force, work, energy, momentum, thermodynamics, waves and light.

Physics I Honors
This course offers the student an extensive in-depth laboratory experience of physical science. Students will be required to demonstrate a higher order of critical thinking, with in-depth real life applications. Topics covered include measurement, graphing, interpretation of experimental data, motion on earth and in the heavens, force, work, energy, thermodynamics, waves, light, and optics with applications.

ELECTIVES

Biology II Honors
This course is an honors credit course designed for experienced science students who have taken Chemistry I and plan to enter a science-related field. College level material is covered at a college level pace. The course includes cell and molecular biology, human anatomy and physiology, plant and animal surveys, genetics and evolution. Guided inquiry laboratory investigations and data analysis are major component of the courses. Fee required.

Biology–Advanced Placement 
The AP Biology course is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester college introductory biology course. Topics include molecules and cells, heredity and evolution and organisms and populations. The course will emphasize the development of an understanding of concepts rather than on memorizing terms and technical details. Essential to this conceptual understanding are a grasp of science as a process rather than as an accumulation of facts; personal experience in scientific inquiry; and application of biological knowledge and critical thinking to environmental and social concerns. AP Biology requires the successful completion of a minimum of 12 labs. Laboratory work encourages the development of important skills such as detailed observation, accurate recording, experimental design, statistical analysis, problem solving skills and use of scientific literature. Students enrolled in AP Biology will be required to attend sessions during Independent Study period as prescribed by the teacher. Fee required. *Upper-level courses are offered if there are adequate number of students requesting the course.

Chemistry II Honors
This course is an honors credit course which treats the topics of chemical bonding, molecular structure, basic organic chemistry, gases, solutions, acid-base theory, thermochemistry and redox reactions. Individual laboratory work is an integral part of the course. *Upper-level courses are offered if there are adequate
number of students requesting the course.

Environmental Science 
This course is a science course that enables students to develop an understanding of natural and man-made environments and environmental problems the world faces. The course surveys components of ecosystems, including energy flow and the structure and dynamics of populations and communities. Students review the processes that affect natural environments, examine the impact on human activities on ecosystems, and discuss current environmental issues.

Physics II Honors
This course will offer an additional semester of honors physics to those who may be interested in pursuing a science curriculum in college. This course will offer laboratory experience. Topics covered will include electric currents, circuits, magnetism, quantum theory and nuclear physics.

Anatomy & Physiology
This course provides a comprehensive study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. This course moves quickly and students enrolled in this course should realize that this course requires time, effort, and reading comprehension. Topics include medical terminology; body organization; homeostasis; cytology; histology; the 11 body systems, and processes. Homeostatic balance, the relationship between structure and function, and the interrelationships between body systems are a focus throughout this course. Online coursework and assessments are a required part of the course. Laboratory work includes dissection of preserved specimens, microscopic study, physiologic experiments, computer simulations, and multimedia presentations. This course is designed for college preparation for those interested in a science related field especially health career majors. Successful completion of this class requires dedication and commitment from the student.

Social Studies

The mission of the Social Studies Department is to produce students who will be able to think critically in the modern world. The department encourages its students to be productive citizens, who respect various cultures, and who can apply their knowledge of history, politics, and economics to their everyday lives.

COURSES

World Geography
Western Civilizations
American History
Civics
Economics
Contemporary Issues
Law Studies
Psychology
Sociology

Honors
World Geography H
Western Civilizations H
American History H
Civics H
Economics H

Advanced Placement
American History AP      
European History AP
Psychology AP
U. S. Government & Politics AP


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

World Geography
World Geography is designed for the student to become aware of the geographical regions of the world, the principles of physical geography, the problems of developing nations, and to understand how cultures of different nations affect lifestyle, government, and social structures.

World Geography Honors
Honors level students are expected to meet all the normal requirements for the World Geography course. In concert with this, Geography Honors students move through course material at a more rapid pace, complete two additional projects, and performance assessments require more writing, reading comprehension, and critical thinking components.

Western Civilization
Western Civilization consists of a chronological study of western civilizations beginning with the Renaissance through the present. The course introduces students to cultural, economic, political, and social developments that played a fundamental role in shaping the world in which they live. Added emphasis is placed on map skills, writing assignments, and computer lessons as a means of conveying information to students. Students are required to read one supplemental book.

Western Civilization Honors
In addition to the regular Western Civilization curriculum, the Western Civilization Honors curriculum includes an additional supplemental reading book, an honors project, and added emphasis on writing, both on tests and in the form of out-of-class assignments. Essays in the honors level course require students to analyze and synthesize information.

European History Advanced Placement
This course should be taken if the student wishes to attempt to earn college credit. European History AP is the equivalent of a full-year college course and offers the student the opportunity for advanced placement in college after the successful completion of the National Examination given in May. The European History Advanced Placement curriculum is designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of Advanced Placement courses. In addition to providing a narrative of events and movements, the goals of the course are to develop an understanding of some of the principal themes in European history. Furthermore, emphasis will be placed on the ability to analyze historical evidence, historical interpretation and an ability to express historical argumentation and synthesis in writing. These objectives will help prepare students to pass the national standardized exam test in May.

American History
American History consists of a chronological study of the American experience from Reconstruction to the present. Emphasis in the course is placed on social history, economics, and the evolution of American institutions. Students are required to read three (3) supplemental books.

American History Honors
This honors course focuses on a critical thinking curriculum. Students are required to apply knowledge learned in class to analytical essays on assessments, homework, and projects. Performance assessments require idea development and analytical thinking. Students are required to read four (4) supplemental books. Students interested in taking American History Honors should be confident in their ability to write and think critically. Exposure to other honors classes may be helpful, but is not required.

American History Advanced Placement
This course should be taken if the student wishes to earn college credit. American History Advanced Placement includes the equivalent of a full-year college course and offers the student the opportunity for advanced placement in college after the successful completion of the Advanced Placement Examination given in May. The course consists of a chronological study of the American experience from colonial America to the present with special attention to the complexities of the American past. The story of the past becomes more comprehensible when attention is paid to how the major figures in history have related to events and to one another. Emphasis is given to political cartoon interpretations and analytical thinking techniques in writing comparative essays.

Civics
Civics consists of a study of United States government institutions with a comparative study of governmental systems of other leading nations in the world. The course stresses that "good government" is best served when people know, understand, and actively participate in the governmental process. Focus is also placed on relevant current government issues and personality profiles of men and women who contributed significantly to the development of government in the United States.

Civics Honors
While core material remains the same in honors, assessments are substantively different. Assessments place special emphasis on writing and higher-level thinking skills. In addition to the coursework, honors students must complete one additional project.

American Government and Politics Advanced Placement
This course should be taken if the student wishes to earn college credit. It includes the equivalent of a full-year college course introduction to American Government and Political Science. The course is designed to increase students’ understanding of the American political system, its framework, traditions, and values. Furthermore, AP Government and Politics covers the nature of American politics, its development over the past two hundred years, and how it functions today. In addition to the framework of the government, students will analyze and evaluate the implementation of public policy and how it applies to them directly. These objectives will help prepare students to pass the national standardized exam test in May.

Economics
This course is designed to provide a foundation to understand both the social science of economics and the everyday economic world. The course is built around a theoretical and personal approach to economics. The basic topics called for by the National Task Force on Economics are given full consideration.

Economics Honors
Economics Honors students will be required to learn course material at an accelerated pace. To this end, units will be taught in greater depth at the honors level. In addition to this, the honors students will be assigned a supplemental reading that will be assessed through an in-depth Socratic seminar. Additional outside readings will be required. Major and minor assessments will involve higher-level thinking skills and real world applications.

ELECTIVES

Contemporary Issues
This course is designed to help students become more aware and involved in current world and local affairs. Students are required to watch television news programs, read the newspaper, read a weekly news magazine, and obtain current news from the Internet. Daily discussions and reading help students form constructive, informative opinions about the happenings that occur in the world.

Law Studies
Open to 11th & 12th Grades This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the purpose and function of laws and the legal system in the United States. The course includes legal topics that have contemporary relevance and encourages students to grapple with alternatives and possible resolutions of issues. Students will explore different types of laws and gain an understanding of the rights that they have as citizens, as well as practical steps that can be taken to protect those rights.

Psychology
This course is designed to give an overall introduction of the elementary principles of human behavior. The course includes such topics as psychobiological processes, sensation and perception, consciousness, learning, memory, intelligence, development, personality, psychological disorders, history of psychology, research methods, motivation and emotion, and stress and conflict.

Psychology Advanced Placement
This course should be taken if the student wishes to earn college credit. Psychology Advanced Placement includes the equivalent of a full-year college course and offers the student the opportunity for advanced placement in college after the successful completion of the Advanced Placement Examination given in May. The course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. They also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice.

Sociology
This course is the study of social action and social organization in human societies. Focus is placed on looking beyond individualistic and psychological explanations for behavior to the broader patterns that explain how individuals act in society. Topics include the sociological perspective, methods of sociological research, culture, family structure, the socialization process, crime, race, ethnicity and gender issues, education, religion, war, social movements, and social change.

Religious Studies

The mission of the Religion Department is to foster within our students spiritual growth through a personal relationship with Jesus, which is strengthened by academic instruction, deepened by experiences of prayer and sacramental celebration, enriched by Apostolic service, and guided by principles of Catholic morality within the Carmelite tradition of openness to God in all events of life.

COURSES

Religious Studies 8 
Religious Studies I
Religious Studies II
Religious Studies III
Religious Studies IV


Course Descriptions

Religious Studies 8 
The eighth grade program introduces the student to the history and traditions of Carmel through a review of Carmelite history and a study of Carmelite Saints and spirituality. Study of prayer as well as experiences in various types of prayer are incorporated in the first semester. Students are encouraged to recognize prayer as a dialogue with God and to evaluate and distinguish different forms and manner of prayer. The course expands into an overview of Church history focusing on Catholic doctrines and teachings, laying a foundation on which all subsequent religion courses are built. Amidst a prayer-filled atmosphere, the student is encouraged to deepen her relationship with Jesus through prayer, Scripture, and service.

Religious Studies I
The curriculum centers around the life of Jesus and basic teachings of the Catholic Church as seen through the Creed and Christian Scriptures. Students are encouraged to know Jesus as friend, brother, and Savior and to grow in awareness of themselves as Christian young women. Within this context, students will study the Church’s teachings on human sexuality as they seek to affirm and strengthen their commitment to living chaste and moral lives.

Religious Studies II
The sophomore curriculum examines the Hebrew Scriptures in order to provide a deeper understanding of Christian roots and a greater appreciation of the people of faith in salvation history. Christian Morality, a study about moral decision making, is a second essential part of the course. Christian Morality is rooted in Sacred Scripture and Church teaching. The sophomore curriculum encourages the student’s moral growth through application of these teachings to their life.

Religious Studies III
The junior curriculum combines an in-depth study of the sacramental life of the Church with a deep analysis of Catholic Social Teaching. A particular focus is how the grace and love we receive from Christ through the Church and its sacraments enables us to effectively and compassionately promote justice, build peace, and defend the life and dignity of the human person in our world.

Religious Studies IV
The senior curriculum has two major components. First semester focuses on God’s universal call to humanity to be in relationship with Him. The course studies each of the major world religions and compares and contrasts these faiths with the Roman Catholic faith. The second semester curriculum introduces various and varied Christian vocations–married, single, and/or religious lives–to which we are called. This course on Christian lifestyles aims to increase student awareness that God’s call is both personal and unique and involves a commitment to love Him and others.