Theater

What is STK?

STK is Mount Carmel Academy's theater club. STK are initials for "Shinto Torii Kabuki," which means "God's Gateway to the Theater." Members of STK study the art of play production. They participate in the activities of the International Thespian Society and stage dramatic and musical productions. Hands-on experience is gained in all elements of theatre including lighting, costumes, makeup, sound and set design, and construction. On-stage learning incorporates the study of acting through characterization, movement, and voice. Opportunities are available to all members to direct, write, and choreograph their own productions.

Main Stage of the International Thespian Festival 

Actor and actress under the stars in %22Silent Sky%22

Mount Carmel Academy was invited to perform “Silent Sky” -- the true story of Henrietta Leavitt (1868-1921), a female astronomer whose calculations became one of the cornerstones of modern astronomical science  -- on the main stage at the International Thespian Festival (ITF) at the University of Nebraska in Lincoln in June 2018. Mount Carmel was one of 11 schools selected by screening teams sent across the United States and Canada, and the only school from Louisiana in the history of the ITF to receive this highly-coveted invitation.

Behind-the-Scenes

STUDENT PERSPECTIVE:
Maria Neal '18 shares STK's experience traveling and performing at the International Thespian Festival in Lincoln, Nebraska.

Peter Pan coming through a foggy window greeting Wendy

Theater classes are practical workshops exploring various theater techniques. Theater productions include a fall drama and spring musical each year. Interested students can explore various elements of the theater including directing, lighting, costumes, makeup, sound and set design, and construction.

Theatre Courses

Acting I

The educational goals of Acting I are the development of creative abilities in the performing arts; artistic discipline in acting, directing, and designing sets; historical and analytical skills for theatre history and dramatic literature; communication and organizational abilities through theatrical production; respect for diversity in the collaborative theatre process; and the ability to enhance the quality of one’s life.

Acting II

Acting II is a continuation of Acting I skills. Students apply what they have learned in Acting I through theatre games, physical and vocal warm-ups, characterization studies, and participation in scenes and performances. Theatre students will acquire the requisite intellectual background and essential artistic experience to pursue careers or further studies in theatre.

Speech

This course is a practicum in which students learn the basics of public speaking by preparing and presenting various speeches.